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Showing posts with label high school. Show all posts
Showing posts with label high school. Show all posts

Monday, December 15, 2014

Tall, Dark & Mysterious Dudes: Hexed by Michelle Krys

This week’s featured book is Hexed by Michelle Krys. This book is a perfect blend of action, romance, and humor that kept me glued to the pages. I happen to love books about witches and witchcraft like James Patterson’s Witch & Wizard, so this book was already on my favorites list when I read that the main character Indigo was a witch who didn’t even know she was a witch. Aha clever right? Well, see for yourself.

A cheerleader at a Fairfield High in a position of popularity, Indigo’s life takes a turn when someone steals an important book from her mother’s occult store, ‘The Black Cat.’ Turns out the recessive genes for being a witch run in Indigo’s family, but until her 200th full moon, Indigo won’t know if she has inherited the powers herself. The stolen book is The Witch Hunter’s Bible, and if it falls into the wrong hands many witches will die. Thrust into the action of a war between witches and sorcerers with a high personal cost, Indigo finds herself under the tutelage of Bishop, an eighteen year-old Warlock who is determined to help her develop her powers. As the secret magical world starts to unfurl for Indigo, she realizes all is not as it seems and forms a plan to reclaim the book.
This is the first book in a new series called The Witch Hunter. Hexed focuses on the main character Indigo, who for the most part is a normal high school girl. Indigo is has a fun feisty spirit, a great sense of independence, and a spunky voice as she navigates her way through the magical world. She’s convinced her occult-believing mother was crazy, but feels that she must investigate some supernatural happenings just to be on the safe side. After meeting Bishop, Indigo adjusts remarkably well to her new life, shedding her cheerleader persona and clique friends without much difficulty because they weren’t real friends anyway.
Instead, Indigo finds a true friend in Paige who is loyal to her from the start. Bishop enters the scene as a mysterious stranger who Indigo just can’t figure out. Is he for real? Or is he something otherworldly altogether? After Indigo, Paige, and Bishop go out on the town, that’s when things really start to heat up in this story. There will be some heartbreak, challenges, and a few laughs along the way. Will Indigo learn the truth about her heritage and take on her chosen destiny? The world of witches is complicated and this book had several twists and turns in plot woven within a battle between witches and witch hunters that made me definitely want to keep reading this series. Hexed is an action-packed read and I am looking forward to the sequel!
Some of my favorite quotes-
“And I just know that this memory will be forever burned into my brain, because this kind of magic – the kind that can’t be conjured with a spell, where everything is just right, and all your problems vanish for three perfect minutes – doesn’t happen everyday.” Indigo Blackwood

” So you’re telling me that on the next full moon, I’m going to turn into a witch.”
” yes.” he nods solemnly. ” You’ll grow a hooknose within a hairy mole at the end, and your hair will turn gray and frizzy– or more frizzy, rather—and your back will grow a hump any camel would envy, and– "Be serious for once.” Indigo & Bishop

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Friday, December 12, 2014

Parkour & murder just how I like it

What We Saw At Night by Jacqueline Mitchard

They sleep during the day, avoiding their greatest enemy: sunlight. When the sun sets and darkness falls, they hit the town. The nighttime world belongs to them. They are Children of Darkness. No, this isn't another young adult novel featuring pointy toothed, blood-sucking teen vampires. Jacquelyn Mitchard's novel What We Saw at Night is about a group of teenagers who suffer from the real world genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum. XP is a fatal allergy to sunlight. Allie Kim, along with her best friends Rob and Juliet, live in a parallel universe compared to "daytimers," the name they've given to people who don't suffer from XP. Allie wakes up when most people are getting home from school or work. She eats dinner as her breakfast and does her school work from home in the wee hours. And she's in bed by sunrise.
Of course, suffering from XP doesn't mean that Allie and her friends don't go through the same growing pains and angst that other teens their age experience. Allie has had a crush on Rob for as long as she can remember. But Allie can also see that Rob only has eyes for Juliet. Unfortunately for Rob, Juliet clearly couldn't be less interested in him. This creates a typical love triangle among very atypical teens. Then everything changes when Juliet introduces Allie and Rob to Parkour, also known as Freerunning, a stunt-sport that features running and climbing off forest cliffs and tall buildings. It's during one of these nighttime Parkour stunts that Allie stumbles upon what looks like a murder. Or at least that's what she tries to convince Rob and Juliet, who didn't see anything. Did she imagine it? XP can sometimes lead to hallucinations in its more degenerative stages. Could Allie be losing her mind?

As Allie delves deeper into what she saw, she uncovers what might be a larger conspiracy, involving a member of the Tabor family. That's the family of doctors that founded and operate the Tabor Clinic. The clinic is the leading research and treatment center for patients with XP. It is the reason Allie, Rob and Juliet's families all moved to Iron Harbor and it's their best hope for finding a cure to the disease. Not only that, Allie begins to suspect that one of her best friends might be involved in the crime. This revelation could lead to Allie, Juliet and Rob to being in serious danger. What We Saw at Night is an engaging blend of real-world drama involving a life-and-death illness and a whodunit thriller. Imagine John Green's recent "The Fault in Our Stars" in a mashup with a Nancy Drew mystery. plus some amazingmroof jumping and wall scaling.


Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Finding Your Way Through Hard Times

The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson

This month I read the very amazing Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson. The title kind of throws you off a bit because maybe you are wondering what does the knife have to do with it and how does it affect the memory. Well, I can tell you all about that! Anderson is one of my favorite authors because he writes with such honesty and grit. She has bravely touched upon very sensitive topics such as rape, eating disorders, suicide and addiction. In doing so, she has helped build the current landscape of contemporary young adult literature. Anderson writes the hard truth, stirs up the debate and discussion among both fans and objectors, and ultimately has created the long overdue conversations about the real issues teenagers face every day.

For the past five years, Hayley Kincaid and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons that have tortured him since his return from Iraq. Now they are back in the town where he grew up so Hayley can attend school. Perhaps, for the first time, Hayley can have a normal life, put aside her own painful memories, even have a relationship with Finn, the hot guy who obviously likes her but is hiding secrets of his own. Will being back home help Andy’s PTSD, or will his terrible memories drag him to the edge of hell, and drugs push him over?
The Impossible Knife of Memory portrays a growing, complex problem particularly relevant in the United States today: the devastating ripple effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. After five years of being home-schooled on the road with her truck-driver Dad, Andy, a veteran who is tormented by memories of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Hayley Kincain finally has a home. But instead of finding a fresh new start her senior year at public school, Hayley is barely getting by. She feels lost and alone in the sea of “normal” students that she refers to as zombies, Hayley never knows if her Dad is having a good day or a bad day, unfortunately until it is too late. He has been drinking so heavily and so much that he goes into rages and then blacks out.
Hayley’s only friend, Gracie, knows Hayley is struggling, but she’s busy with her own problems —Then Hayley meets Finn, a sharp-witted boy who manages to bring out the smart, clever girl others don’t see. But Hayley doesn’t trust Finn enough to share her secrets. In fact, she doesn’t trust anyone — and that’s the problem.
Anderson’s portrayal of a family broken by war, death, divorce and addiction is very honest. “Killing people is easier than it should be but staying alive is even harder.” Andy tells a teen on Veteran’s Day. Despite the heavy subject matter, Anderson’s observations offer very realistic and emotional depth and validation to this story. At the heart of it is a tough yet fragile girl who lives in a world with a rocky foundation beneath her feet that is constantly shifting and the relentless challenge to keep balance has worn her out.
The Impossible Knife of Memory is a beautifully written book. I loved how Anderson describes memories and situations. The relationships are heartbreaking, yet there is hope, and I think that’s what makes this book so emotionally draining. There is so much love and yet there is the knowledge that it might not be enough. The supporting characters in this book are full of drama, and distraction, but ultimately help the story and Hayley to come to a place of peace.

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Ex Inc. will Fix U


Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus wrote this awesome book called Over You! I really liked it a lot and now want to read more of their books. The story is about a girl named Max who gets dumped by her boyfriend and tries like heck to get over him. She decides to use her pain and start her own business called Ex, Inc. She helps other girls get over their break ups and does such a fantastic job that she realizes she wants to study business at NYU. Naturally, things get complicated when Max's old boyfriend shows up. You have to read this book to find out what happens! I hope you get a chance to read this one it would be great one for an Anti-Valentine's day treat!

I heard Christina Perri's Jar of Hearts today and it totally reminded me of Max's plight. I posted the video so you can see it too!




Friday, August 10, 2012

Finding Meaning and Purpose in Your Life

The third book I have read on the YALSA Top Ten Nominees is "What Happened to Goodbye" by Sarah Dessen. I have been a long time fan of Ms. Dessen because I love Realistic Fiction. She writes with such passion and lets the reader dive right into the main characters life and problems. Hope you will read this one because it is very good! What Happened to Goodybye by Sarah Dessen (2011) McLean's parents are divorced and she is struggling to adapt to a life without her parents together. She goes with her dad each times he moves from town to town because he works a restaurant consultant. Each time she moves she changes her name and her persona, sometimes she a sweet prep girl, or a cheerleader or sometimes even a wanna be bad girl. However this new town she has just landed in has managed to reach out and grab her like no other town has before. This time she just might be able to work on becoming the real McLean and also figure out just where she belongs. As she learns more about herself, she realizes that Dave Wade the boy next door may have some excellent words of wisdom. He inspires McLean to search her soul and find out who her "2 a.m. person" will be. Dessen always create such interesting and diverse characters in her books. I loved the deep conversations that McLean has with Dave and with herself. Finding yourself when you are in your teens is sometimes hard and going through divorce with custody issues, having axes to grind, and being stressed over family separations would only make it harder. I think this is a great book for teens to read, especially for those that enjoy realistic fiction! Happy Reading!! ♥ Mrs. Librarian Lady

Perks of Reading "Wallflower"

I just finished reading "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky! This was my second time reading this book and I have to say it was just as good if not better than the first time. This storyteller Charlie is such a sweetie th at you can't help but love him. He tells the story of his first year in high school and how he meets friends and tries new things. He also writes to a person that he calls "Dear Friend" and we never really know who this person is, but in the end I felt like I was the friend that Charlie was writing to. Charlie has so many sad things to tell and also many interesting stories that the book is extremely readable for teens. I'm sure many teens could relate with Charlie's story. Even though it is over 20 years old the "Perks of a Wallflower" is an age old story. I wanted to re-read the book before the movie comes out on September 21st 2012!

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Magic, Mystery & Cons

Black Heart by Holly Black Cassel Sharpe is at his same old game of cons in the third installment of the Curse Worker's series Black Heart. The love of his life Lila hates him, his best friend Sam is on the edge of flipping out, his brother Barron has lies upon lies piling up, and a new issue has arisen with a mysterious and secretive girl named Mina Lang. Cassel is up to his ears and over his head with the federal government acting as an agent in training and he knows he can't trust anyone anymore. And frankly sometimes he can't even trust himself to do the right thing. Black Heart proves to be another excellent addition to this magical mobster series. Holly Black brings magic, mystery, love, and cons together seamlessly in this book. It seems like Black Heart may be the end of this series, but the end may truly just be the beginning for Cassel Sharpe! I recommend reading this entire series. It is truly an exciting and funny adventure of a family that is entrenched in the world of magical mobsters and shows the strength of one young man only 17 years old - the Cassel Sharpe - who can rise above the menagerie of obstacles that keep getting in his way to having a normal teenage life. Yes start with White Cat and then read Red Glove and finish with Black Heart! Happily ever after reading to you all ♥

Friday, March 02, 2012

Your Best & Worst Night Ever!


"I Love You Beth Cooper" by Larry Doyle 2007

This book is funny in a strange sadistic sort of way. It gives hope to those who go after what they really want and basically don't mind getting smacked in the eye, falling out of a window, almost ran over by a Hummer, losing their pants, and being bitten by a thousand mosquitoes just to be near the one that they adore. I would recommend this book to older teens 16+ that don't mind a few obscenities here and there. Doyle's writing is seriously hilarious and will have you laughing and snickering when some things are inappropriate, yet somehow still funny. I love this book because I can just hear sci fi nerds all over saying hurray for Denis Cooverman! Check out the movie on DVD too it's not too different than the book.

Friday, December 16, 2011

Tweaking the Truth Is Harmless Right?

I just happened to pick up the book Harmless by Dana Reinhardt the other day and I am sure glad I did. The book is filled with the drama of high school woes and plays upon the idea of what is right and wrong and how far one can go to tweak the truth and get away with it. It is a fairly fast read and a real page turner. The one thing I keep thinking of after reading "Harmless" is don't ever lie because if you weave a web a lies it might get so big you can't find your way out of it.


Harmless by Dana Reinhardt (2008)

Ninth grade friends Emma, Anna, and Mariah are at a party with older high school boys when they should be at the movies like they told their parents. When Emma's mother calls her cell they freak out and decide to make up a story so they won't get in trouble at home. It seems like the easy way out. What happens next challenges their friendship, their community, their relationships with their families, and their sense of themselves. Told in the voices of the three girls who must learn to live with the lies they tell, "Harmless" is a gripping and provocative novel full of startling turns and surprises.

Thursday, June 30, 2011

The Real Deal

This week’s featured genre is realistic fiction. What I find interesting is that I am a huge fantasy lover and at the same time I love to read realistic stories as well. I feel that young adult realistic fiction has a lot to offer teens today because many of the topics focus on the issues that they are going through at the time. Some of the books that I have read lately have touched on suicide, depression, drug addiction, and child abuse. These issues may not come up in the average teens daily lives, but I think that working with teens has brought me a lot of insight on how they think and deal with things and it can be very helpful for them to read fictional stories that help them to understand that the world is a very big place and they are going to encounter so many different issues as they learn and grow and get older. With that said, realistic fiction can sometimes be a downer, but as with all things in life it has its ups and downs, which makes for pretty great reading most of the time. So here are a few of my favorites and I highly recommend that you read them because they are awesome!

"A good book should leave you... slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading it."

~William Styron, interview, Writers at Work, 1958

As always, Happy Reading To You!


An Abundance of Katherines by John Green (2006) Michael Printz Award Honor 2007

What can I say about this book? Well, for starters, it is brilliant and funny and just plain amazing! John Green has a fantastic way of weaving humor into the mundane world and does it with such style that reading this book feels like watching a movie or taking a ride on a Ferris wheel. Colin Singleton is a child prodigy who never made it to a full blown genius and boy that saddens him. He loves to make anagrams and can anagram his ass off in any given situation. Alas, poor Colin has girl issues and he just can't seem to get over the break up with his girlfriend Katherine. Oh and by the way, she is the 19th Katherine that he has gone out with over the course of his 17 year life.
The story just keeps getting funnier and funnier and his best friend Hasan is hilarious too with his smart quips and snide namecalling. The two are always badgering each other with a barrage of insults, but of course there are some compliments in there somewhere I just know it. The two decide to go on a road trip and by golly they end up in some back woods town in Tennessee called Gutshot, and it's there that they meet the adorable Lindsey Lee Wells. From there on things just get funnier because Lindsey has a boyfriend named Colin who the guys nickname TOC which stand for "the other Colin" and Colin decides to come up with a theorem for why he has been dumped by so many Katherines. This lively coming of age tale is wonderfully written and is quite spunky and full of life. I would recommend this book to anyone that is looking for a good book to read that is totally engaging and will have you laughing and crying and cheering in the end for Colin Singleton and his friends. An Abundance of Katherines was also a 2007 Michael Printz Award Honor Book.


Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan (2010)

I’m gonna start this out by saying that John Green is totally brilliant! Ah, but you knew I was going to say that right? Of course, I also have to give props to David Levithan for this one too. This is one of the few novels written in alternating points of view that I totally loved because it just works. This book is definitely a wild ride for anyone who reads this book. The story is told in two different voices and these voices are two different characters both named Will Grayson.

Even though the book is titled after these two, one thing for sure is that the whole story focuses around the biggest person of all in the story and that is the magnanimous Tiny Cooper. Tiny is such a fun, spontaneous, and joyous young man, and a sheer force of love and power to be reckoned with. That is why both Will Grayson’s find him so irresistible. The first Will Grayson is Tiny’s best friend and confidant, the other is his love interest. By a strange chance meeting the first Will Grayson meets the other in a seedy porn shop called Frenchie’s. This chance meeting alters both of their lives forever. Add to the mix, Tiny’s amazing and genius life story, which is a musical that is written, directed, and produced by none other than Tiny himself. Will Grayson, Will Grayson is an inspirational tale that is creatively written, seductively cool, and so uncontrollably witty you’ll find yourself crying at times and laughing out loud uncontrollably. A must read for anyone that loves a good story!


Glimpse by Carol Lynch Williams (Simon & Schuster, 2010)

Sisters Lizzie and Hope are only one year apart and best friends until Lizzie suddenly tries to end her life. Hope can’t understand why Lizzie would do such a thing and their mother has never paid much attention to either of them. Hope had been having awful nightmares which she really felt like she was awake and Lizzie had been having crying fits for a long time before she tried to kill herself. What does all of this mean? Hope must figure out the puzzle while Lizzie wastes away in a mental institution, and unravel the secrets that will lead her to save her sister. Written in verse, Williams has created a riveting story that is very edgy and provocative!
This novel caught my attention straight away as it is completely written in verse. It is extremely emotional and written very tastefully. The glimpses we as the reader get into Hope’s life are incredible and as I read I became overwrought with grief for her and her sister. This book reminded me that there are so many children out there being abused even by their own parents, which is really very tragic.
I would recommend this book to older teens that enjoy reading realistic fiction on various life issues. It is a fairly fast read because reading the verses goes a lot faster than regular text. I think this book is for older teens because of the nature of the situations involved in the story and the seriousness of suicide and sexual abuse.

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mad Fallen Angel Love

This week I thought that instead of writing reviews I would try something quick and snappy. I have recently finished the first two books in the Hush, Hush series by Becca Fitzpatrick and am feeling quite inspired by love, mystery, and angels. I hope you like my poetic little word plays!


Fitzpatrick, Becca. Hush, Hush. 1st. ed. New York: Simon & Shuster Publishers. 2009. 391 pgs. ISBN: 9781416989417.

Summary: In this supernatural YA fiction, high school sophomore Nora has always been very cautious in her relationships, but when Patch, who has a dark side she can sense, enrolls at her school, she is mysteriously and strongly drawn to him, despite warnings from her best friend, the school counselor, and her own instincts.

Here is my word play for Hush, Hush:

Dark Stranger brings on Hot Danger and all the while Mysterious Beings are Running Wild


Fitzpatrick, Becca. Crescendo. BFYR. New York: Simon & Shuster Publishers. 2010. 427 pgs. Sequel to Hush, Hush. ISBN: 9781416989431.


Summary: In this sequel to Hush, Hush, Sixteen-year-old Nora Grey struggles to face the truth while coping with having a fallen angel boyfriend named Patch and unraveling the mystery surrounding her father's death.

My word play for Crescendo is:

Love meets Misfortune with so much Betrayal, then to be reunited only to Fail

Saturday, May 07, 2011

Freaks Can Be Fun



Hey What's up Mrs. Librarian Lady? I was thinking of reading some new books but was not sure cause there's so many out there. I'm in 8th grade right now and going to high school next fall so I was wondering if you know any good books that have anything to do with high school and meeting new people. I like the books that you read and recommend all the time!

Thanx a bunch

SweeteeBee

Hi there SweeteeBee!

I'm so glad you asked about new books because I know what you mean about there being so many out there! I try to read as much new stuff as possible just to stay in the loop. Right now I am reading the 3rd book in the "Forest of Hands and Teeth" series called "The Dark and Hollow Places" by Carrie Ryan and the 2nd book in the "Hush, Hush" series called "Crescendo" by Becca Fitzpatrick. I haven't finished them yet, but they are really really good! I also just finished "The Red Pyramid" by Rick Riordan and have to say that I love love this one! I'm waiting to get my hands on the next one. The book that I have in mind for you is Monster High by Lisi Harrison author of "The Clique" series. This is a really clever book that deals with high school issues in a freakish and fanciful way. I think you will really like this one and there is also a television show on Nickelodeon based on the novel too!


"Monster High" by Lisi Harrison

Melody Carver is no stranger to being an outcast because she used to be considered homely and ugly at her old school in California. Hopefully her new nose job will help her at her new school in Salem Oregon. On the flip side, being green and a descendant of Frankenstein make Frankie Stein have to seriously hide her differentness in order to not create a total mob against her. Both of these girls are striving to fit in with their new surroundings without giving away their deep-seated fears. Both Melody and Frankie try to make friends, but they still feel left out. Frankie has to deal with her family not wanting her to come out of the closet about her monster origins. After a wild night at the homecoming dance everyone will have to re-evaluate who’s hot and who’s not in this adorable tale. Harrison hits the mark by mixing monsters, ghouls, and freaks with the age- old problem of teenagers trying to fit in. The message is clear that whoever or whatever you are, it’s best to just be yourself no matter what.