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Showing posts with label friendships. Show all posts
Showing posts with label friendships. Show all posts

Monday, June 22, 2015

She Was Forged From Iron - Holly Black's The Darkest Part of the Forest

The Darkest Part of the Forest

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointy as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down and a hero is needed to save them all, Hazel tries to remember her years spent pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

A new novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Holly Black. Start reading now at http://DarkestPartoftheForest.com


I love Holly Black and am a total fan of faeries. This is why I read everything that Black writes! The Darkest Part of the Forest was an interesting read for me because it is centered in the town of Fairfold, which is a place full of magic and horror. I have studied faeries almost my whole life and am ever so intrigued by the history and fanfare around them. While faeries have been known to humans as the fair ones, it seems that the magical inhabitants that live near Fairfold are not all sweet and adorable like the ones we see in the movies. These faeries are the bad boys of magic and there seems to be some kind of faerie family feud going on that no one can stop. I love the magic and the mystery of the book. Way out there in the middle of the forest lies a beautiful boy and he's in a glass coffin that no one can break. He's mysterious and obviously very hot because everyone is in love with him, boys, girls, moms, basically whoever gazes upon him. I like Ben because he has the magic of music inside him and that comes out when he most needs it for survival. I like Hazel because she's tough and can wield a sword like a medieval warrior. Severin is an interesting character because he's in the glass coffin for most of the book, but when he gets out he's got Hazel and Ben on his side to look out for him. Black weaves in what I would call her magic, which is her expertise in the land of the faerie and her clever way of mixing it in with the human world, which I always love. I had a feeling that The Darkest Part of the Forest might become a series, but it seems like it had a pretty good solid ending. I won't tell you if it was a happily ever after one or not, you have to read it for yourself!

Happy Reading to you!

Mrs. Librarian Lady

Tuesday, June 02, 2015

The False Prince not to be confused with Fresh Prince



"THE FALSE PRINCE is the thrilling first book in a brand-new trilogy filled with danger and deceit and hidden identities that will have readers rushing breathlessly to the end.

In a discontent kingdom, civil war is brewing. To unify the divided people, Conner, a nobleman of the court, devises a cunning plan to find an impersonator of the king’s long-lost son and install him as a puppet prince. Four orphans are recruited to compete for the role, including a defiant boy named Sage. Sage knows that Conner’s motives are more than questionable, yet his life balances on a sword’s point — he must be chosen to play the prince or he will certainly be killed. But Sage’s rivals have their own agendas as well.

As Sage moves from a rundown orphanage to Conner’s sumptuous palace, layer upon layer of treachery and deceit unfold, until finally, a truth is revealed that, in the end, may very well prove more dangerous than all of the lies taken together.

An extraordinary adventure filled with danger and action, lies and deadly truths that will have readers clinging to the edge of their seats."

I finally read this book after hearing about for so so long. It was one of the Teens' Top Ten nominees and I really loved the cover so I finally got to reading it. I was quite surprised at how good this book is! Right from the start there is action and intrigue. There are orphans who are being rounded up and taken to a secluded castle for who knows what reason? Secrets and a long history of regents trying to scratch their way up to the throne will have you truly spellbound. Ah and it wouldn't be a YA novel without a little bit of true love and romance right? I'm sure you want to know what happens to Sage and his so called orphan buddies right? Well, you will soon find out if you read The False Prince!

My favorite quotes from The False Prince:



"If I had to do it all over again, I would not have chosen this life. Then again, I’m not sure I ever had a choice. Sage

These were my thoughts as I raced away from the market, with a stolen roast tucked under my arm. I’d never attempted roast thievery before, and I was already regretting it. It happens to be very difficult to hold a chunk of raw meat while running. More slippery than I’d anticipated. If the butcher didn’t catch me with his cleaver first, and literally cut off my future plans, I vowed to remember to get the meat wrapped next time. Then steal it. Sage

He was only a few paces behind now, chasing me at a better speed than I’d have expected for a man of his girth. He yelled very loudly in his native language, one I didn’t recognize.

He was originally from one of the far western countries. Undoubtedly a country where killing a meat thief was allowed. Sage about Connor Bevin

It was this sort of thought that encouraged me to run faster. I rounded a corner just as the cleaver suddenly cut into a wood post behind me. Even though he was aiming for me, I couldn’t help but admire his throwing accuracy. If I hadn’t turned when I did, the cleaver would’ve found its target. Sage


And I might have made it, if not for the bald man sitting outside the tavern, who stretched out his foot in time to trip me. Luckily, I managed to keep hold of the roast, although it did no favors to my right shoulder as I fell onto the hard dirt road. Sage

The butcher leaned over me and laughed. “ ’Bout time you get what’s comin’ to you, filthy beggar.” Sage

As a point of fact, I hadn’t begged for anything. It was beneath me. Sage


Wednesday, December 17, 2014

I See Dead People - Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

Name of the Star: Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson

The day Louisiana teenager Rory Deveaux arrives in London marks a memorable occasion. For Rory, it's the start of a new life at a London boarding school. But for many, this will be remembered as the day a series of brutal murders broke out across the city, gruesome crimes mimicking the horrific Jack the Ripper events of more than a century ago.

Soon “Rippermania” takes hold of modern-day London, and the police are left with few leads and no witnesses. Except one. Rory spotted the man police believe to be the prime suspect. But she is the only one who saw him. Even her roommate, who was walking with her at the time, didn't notice the mysterious man. So why can only Rory see him? And more urgently, why has Rory become his next target? In this edge-of-your-seat thriller, full of suspense, humor, and romance, Rory will learn the truth about the secret ghost police of London and discover her own shocking abilities.


Ok, so I’ve been hanging out in London lately, well not really in London, but in my mind London for a whole entire month while reading the Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson. I am completely hooked on this series and I feel like Rory Deveaux is a character that I could totally be friends with. She's very brave, is funny in her own right of mind, she talks a lot and has great stories that I could just hear over and over and she has good values and can tell what is right and what is wrong.

Rory's life is by far anything but normal, she moved to London to attend an elite school called Wexford and upon chance ends up having to deal with a new found gift called “the sight” that allows her to see other beings that most people can’t see. If you like ghosts and secret ghost hunting societies that form a special bond with each other you will love Name of the Star. I first decided to read this book because it totally name drops Jack the Ripper in the summary, but after getting into the story I found that there is much more going on here than on a reality t.v. show!! Rory becomes friends with Stephen, Callum and Boo a dynamic trio with special ghost hunting operational forces. Facing new missions and mysteries around all kinds of ghosts, the four grow together and form an unbeatable team. I love this kind of teamwork especially since it deals with the paranormal and the dark and dangerous streets of London.

This is more than just a ghostly read, this is definitely an intriguing mystery that taps into the paranormal and beyond. The dialogue is perfect, the scenery described wonderfully, and the plot captivating. The ending is just enough of a tease that you'll immediately want to read the second book in the series The Madness Underneath (which is exactly what I did!). But... If you love this series as much as I do, I’m sorry to say that you’ll have to wait patiently for the third book The Shadow Cabinet to come out in February 2015!

"Fear can't hurt you. When it washes over you, give it no power. It's a snake with no venom. Remember that. That knowledge can save you." Jo ~World War II ghost lady

Happy Holidays & Happy Reading!

Friday, December 12, 2014

Parkour & murder just how I like it

What We Saw At Night by Jacqueline Mitchard

They sleep during the day, avoiding their greatest enemy: sunlight. When the sun sets and darkness falls, they hit the town. The nighttime world belongs to them. They are Children of Darkness. No, this isn't another young adult novel featuring pointy toothed, blood-sucking teen vampires. Jacquelyn Mitchard's novel What We Saw at Night is about a group of teenagers who suffer from the real world genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum. XP is a fatal allergy to sunlight. Allie Kim, along with her best friends Rob and Juliet, live in a parallel universe compared to "daytimers," the name they've given to people who don't suffer from XP. Allie wakes up when most people are getting home from school or work. She eats dinner as her breakfast and does her school work from home in the wee hours. And she's in bed by sunrise.
Of course, suffering from XP doesn't mean that Allie and her friends don't go through the same growing pains and angst that other teens their age experience. Allie has had a crush on Rob for as long as she can remember. But Allie can also see that Rob only has eyes for Juliet. Unfortunately for Rob, Juliet clearly couldn't be less interested in him. This creates a typical love triangle among very atypical teens. Then everything changes when Juliet introduces Allie and Rob to Parkour, also known as Freerunning, a stunt-sport that features running and climbing off forest cliffs and tall buildings. It's during one of these nighttime Parkour stunts that Allie stumbles upon what looks like a murder. Or at least that's what she tries to convince Rob and Juliet, who didn't see anything. Did she imagine it? XP can sometimes lead to hallucinations in its more degenerative stages. Could Allie be losing her mind?

As Allie delves deeper into what she saw, she uncovers what might be a larger conspiracy, involving a member of the Tabor family. That's the family of doctors that founded and operate the Tabor Clinic. The clinic is the leading research and treatment center for patients with XP. It is the reason Allie, Rob and Juliet's families all moved to Iron Harbor and it's their best hope for finding a cure to the disease. Not only that, Allie begins to suspect that one of her best friends might be involved in the crime. This revelation could lead to Allie, Juliet and Rob to being in serious danger. What We Saw at Night is an engaging blend of real-world drama involving a life-and-death illness and a whodunit thriller. Imagine John Green's recent "The Fault in Our Stars" in a mashup with a Nancy Drew mystery. plus some amazingmroof jumping and wall scaling.


Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Steelheart: taking dystopia to another level!

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson is a fast-paced novel, and the first installment in his Reckoners series.

“The superheroes came, but they weren’t exactly what everyone thought they’d be. The Epics, as they’re called, have incredible powers, but with great power comes great corruptibility.
Soon, the Epics takes over the world. They fight against each other, gaining territory and ruling the humans as their subjects. Some are smart and set up cities in their honor, a place where they can control the population and get them to do their bidding.
Such is life in Newcago under Steeheart’s reign. It’s all David has known for the past 10 years. But while most people just try to survive in a world that is literally made of steel, David has other plans. He wants to join the Reckoners and avenge his father, whom Steelheart killed the day he came into town.
The Reckoners are a group of humans led by the mysterious Prof. Their goal is to kill as many Epics as possible. And David is about to show them what he’s got. He knows something no one else does. Because no matter what Steelheart says, he’s not completely invincible.
David’s seen Steelheart bleed, and he intends to see it again.”
Steelheart is a fast-paced, suspenseful page-turner. With cliffhangers at the end of every chapter, it will be hard to put this book down long enough to eat and sleep, never mind doing responsible things like going to work or school.
Set in a world that is vivid and complex, this is not a book that seems overwhelming or overly detailed. Sanderson does an excellent job of feeding you information that is necessary in the moment, rather than overloading you right from the beginning.
The humor in this book is well placed, as well. In a novel that could take itself too seriously but doesn’t, the purposefully terrible metaphors will have you laughing every time you think of them.
With a quickly escalating plot and a few twists and turns, this is definitely a book you’ll want on your to-be-read list. And while it does answer many of the questions raised throughout the book, enough is left unanswered to cause you to want to read the next installation, Firefight, like, right now. Sadly, we’ll have to wait until 2014 for that one.

“Incredible cosmic powers do not equate with high IQ.” David, Steelheart

Happy Reading to You!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Finding Your Way Through Hard Times

The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson

This month I read the very amazing Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson. The title kind of throws you off a bit because maybe you are wondering what does the knife have to do with it and how does it affect the memory. Well, I can tell you all about that! Anderson is one of my favorite authors because he writes with such honesty and grit. She has bravely touched upon very sensitive topics such as rape, eating disorders, suicide and addiction. In doing so, she has helped build the current landscape of contemporary young adult literature. Anderson writes the hard truth, stirs up the debate and discussion among both fans and objectors, and ultimately has created the long overdue conversations about the real issues teenagers face every day.

For the past five years, Hayley Kincaid and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons that have tortured him since his return from Iraq. Now they are back in the town where he grew up so Hayley can attend school. Perhaps, for the first time, Hayley can have a normal life, put aside her own painful memories, even have a relationship with Finn, the hot guy who obviously likes her but is hiding secrets of his own. Will being back home help Andy’s PTSD, or will his terrible memories drag him to the edge of hell, and drugs push him over?
The Impossible Knife of Memory portrays a growing, complex problem particularly relevant in the United States today: the devastating ripple effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. After five years of being home-schooled on the road with her truck-driver Dad, Andy, a veteran who is tormented by memories of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Hayley Kincain finally has a home. But instead of finding a fresh new start her senior year at public school, Hayley is barely getting by. She feels lost and alone in the sea of “normal” students that she refers to as zombies, Hayley never knows if her Dad is having a good day or a bad day, unfortunately until it is too late. He has been drinking so heavily and so much that he goes into rages and then blacks out.
Hayley’s only friend, Gracie, knows Hayley is struggling, but she’s busy with her own problems —Then Hayley meets Finn, a sharp-witted boy who manages to bring out the smart, clever girl others don’t see. But Hayley doesn’t trust Finn enough to share her secrets. In fact, she doesn’t trust anyone — and that’s the problem.
Anderson’s portrayal of a family broken by war, death, divorce and addiction is very honest. “Killing people is easier than it should be but staying alive is even harder.” Andy tells a teen on Veteran’s Day. Despite the heavy subject matter, Anderson’s observations offer very realistic and emotional depth and validation to this story. At the heart of it is a tough yet fragile girl who lives in a world with a rocky foundation beneath her feet that is constantly shifting and the relentless challenge to keep balance has worn her out.
The Impossible Knife of Memory is a beautifully written book. I loved how Anderson describes memories and situations. The relationships are heartbreaking, yet there is hope, and I think that’s what makes this book so emotionally draining. There is so much love and yet there is the knowledge that it might not be enough. The supporting characters in this book are full of drama, and distraction, but ultimately help the story and Hayley to come to a place of peace.

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Friday, August 29, 2014

Love, Laughter & Loss + Forgiveness = Real Life

The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

Seventeen-year-old Lennie Walker (named
after John Lennon), bookworm and band
geek, plays second clarinet and spends her
time tucked safely and happily in the shadow
of her fiery sister Bailey. But when Bailey
dies suddenly, Lennie is catapulted to center
stage of her own life—and, despite her
nonexistent history with boys, finds herself
struggling to balance two. Toby was
Bailey’s boyfriend; his grief mirrors Lennie’s
own. Joe is the new boy in town, a
transplant from Paris whose nearly magical
grin is matched only by his musical talent.
For Lennie, they’re the sun and the moon;
one boy takes her out of her sorrow, the
other comforts her in it. But just like their
celestial counterparts, they can’t collide
without the whole wide world exploding.
I can safely say The Sky is Everywhere
is one of my favorite books ever. I have never
finished a book and felt this emotional before,
last night when I turned the last page I felt like
crying, laughing, writing and running in a field
to nowhere in particular, and all at the same
time. It’s now been almost 12 hours and I can’t
stop thinking about this book!
I wasn’t really looking for a serious book I just
chose this one because it was sitting on the
shelf in the YA room looking a bit lonely. From
start to finish, my heart broke and got glued
back together more than once and I feel like
the cast of characters are now permanently
stuck to my life. The things from this book that
really stuck with me are how close Lennie and
her sister Bailey were, Joe’s eyelashes (bat,
bat, bat), Toby’s sad eyes and Gram’s
garden.

Beautifully written, The Sky is Everywhere
is about loss, grief, pain, healing, hoping and
love. The sudden death of Bailey a vibrant
nineteen-year-old is at the center of the story,
and her family’s struggle to cope is
heartbreaking and heartwarming at the same
time. Bailey and Lennie have been raised by
their grandmother and uncle, as their mother
abandoned them years before. The girls talk
about their mother as if she is on a journey
around the world and she’ll be back someday
to stay. The love stories in this book are
many and multi-layered. They include the
love between sisters, the mother-like love
between grandmother and granddaughter,
and breathtaking head-over-heels first love.
Music and poetry bring together the
instruments of healing for Lennie and her
family in this wonderful story about loss, love
and forgiveness.


Happy Reading To You!!!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Friday, January 25, 2013

If You Want a Good Cry on Valentine's Day

There are so many talented YA authors out right now and one of my favorites is Mr. John Green. Somehow he is able to capture the realism of teen life and emotions. I highly recommend his latest book "The Fault in Our Stars" and I think it would be a tremendously sad book to read just before Valentine's Day. I have to admit that from around chapter 24 and on I basically cried my eyes out while continuing to read and sob from time to time. This book is painfully sad and it pulls no punches in its terrible descriptions of late-stage cancer. At some points, readers may even wonder why, if pain and love are so inner connected that we should care to fall in love at all. However, the amazing John Green pulls it all together in the end and we realize that a person can learn so much from being in love, and that he or she will come out on the other side of a love experience a changed person.


Friday, August 10, 2012

What's Brewing in the Chemical Garden??

Last week I finished my fifth book from the YALSA Teens' Top Ten nominees and it's "Withe" by Lauren DeStefano. This book had so many elements that I love in YA sci-fi books. There's that distinct dystopic element where the world has turned into this really ugly place to live and humans are doing horrible things to each other. Then there's the love element that is brewing underneath all of the grossness that is going on that I totally love. In Wither you get all of this and more. After modern science turns every human into a genetic time bomb with men dying at age twenty-five and women dying at age twenty, girls are kidnapped and married off in order to repopulate the world. The main character is a teen girl named Rhine who gets kidnapped and married off to a rich man's son. She is being held captive with two other girls she calls her sister-wives and plots her escape daily. She meets Gabriel who has been in captive his whole life and something special begins to build between the two of them. The most interesting and scary part in this book is what is going on behind closed doors down in the basement that you will not believe!! And if you loved this book you have to continue reading the "Chemical Garden" series and read "Fever" it was completely and totally amazing!! Happy Reading! ♥ Mrs. Librarian Lady

A Lovely Island Teeming with Evil Water Horses!

The fourth book that I have read from the YALSA Teens' Top Ten nominees is "The Scorpio Races" by Maggie Stiefvater. Here's my little review of it - Every November in Thisby there is a tradition called the Scorpio Races, a dangerous and sometimes de adly race where riders attempt to keep their evil, blood-thirsty water horses under control long enough to make it to the finish line. With four wins to his name, 19 year-old Sean Kendrick is sure to win on his bosses water horse named Corr. However, enter Puck aka Kate Connolly, who is desperate to win the race to save her family home. Not only is she the first girl to ever enter the race, but she intends to ride her own horse Dove, who is not an evil water horse. Things heat up in this epic tale of mythical creatures versus humans as Puck and Sean get to know each other and find a common bond. The Scorpio Races is beautifully written by Stiefvater. Told from the point of view of Sean and Puck in alternating chapters, there is an understanding of what winning the race means for both of them. The water horses come to life, and are both deadly and mesmerizing at the same time. I almost forgot to add that the main character Sean Kendrick is really awesome! He loves his horse so much that he's willing to let him go to be free in the ocean if he never returns to him. But the horse loves him too so you have to read this book to find out what happens with Sean and his water horse Corr!! It's the best part of the book!!!!! Happy Reading! ♥ Mrs. Librarian Lady

Perks of Reading "Wallflower"

I just finished reading "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky! This was my second time reading this book and I have to say it was just as good if not better than the first time. This storyteller Charlie is such a sweetie th at you can't help but love him. He tells the story of his first year in high school and how he meets friends and tries new things. He also writes to a person that he calls "Dear Friend" and we never really know who this person is, but in the end I felt like I was the friend that Charlie was writing to. Charlie has so many sad things to tell and also many interesting stories that the book is extremely readable for teens. I'm sure many teens could relate with Charlie's story. Even though it is over 20 years old the "Perks of a Wallflower" is an age old story. I wanted to re-read the book before the movie comes out on September 21st 2012!

Monday, May 21, 2012

Some Clarity Did Me Good on a Sunday Afternoon

Perception a Clarity Novel was a great book to read on a Sunday when I was trying to relax! It began interesting and continued to keep me interested through the whole story. I actually read this book in a few hours because I wanted to know what happened to Clare. The story of Clare and her family did remind me a little bit of the Lilydale series, but all in all it was a great book. I like the way that Harrington writes - well developed characters and descriptions that helped to understand their personalities and looks. I highly recommend this book to those that love mysteries with supernatural qualities! Here's a review of the book - Happy Reading to you all!! PERCEPTION (Clarity #2)Scholastic/Point, March 1, 2012, Age 14+ When you can see things others can't, what do you do when someone's watching you? Everybody knows about Clarity "Clare" Fern. She's the psychic girl in school, the one who can place her hands on something and see hidden visions from the past. Only Clare would rather not be a celebrity. She prefers hanging back, observing. Her gift is not a game to her. But then someone starts playing with her head . . . and heart. Messages and gifts from a secret admirer crop up everywhere Clare turns. Could they be from Gabriel, the gorgeous boy who gets Clare's pulse racing? Or from Justin, Clare's hopeful ex-boyfriend who'd do anything to win her back? One thing is certain. Clare needs to solve this mystery, and soon. Because the messages are becoming sinister, and a girl in town has suddenly disappeared.

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Magic, Mystery & Cons

Black Heart by Holly Black Cassel Sharpe is at his same old game of cons in the third installment of the Curse Worker's series Black Heart. The love of his life Lila hates him, his best friend Sam is on the edge of flipping out, his brother Barron has lies upon lies piling up, and a new issue has arisen with a mysterious and secretive girl named Mina Lang. Cassel is up to his ears and over his head with the federal government acting as an agent in training and he knows he can't trust anyone anymore. And frankly sometimes he can't even trust himself to do the right thing. Black Heart proves to be another excellent addition to this magical mobster series. Holly Black brings magic, mystery, love, and cons together seamlessly in this book. It seems like Black Heart may be the end of this series, but the end may truly just be the beginning for Cassel Sharpe! I recommend reading this entire series. It is truly an exciting and funny adventure of a family that is entrenched in the world of magical mobsters and shows the strength of one young man only 17 years old - the Cassel Sharpe - who can rise above the menagerie of obstacles that keep getting in his way to having a normal teenage life. Yes start with White Cat and then read Red Glove and finish with Black Heart! Happily ever after reading to you all ♥

Friday, April 27, 2012

Hex Hall X 3 = Awesome

Spell Bound (Hex Hall #3) by Rachel Hawkins Just as Sophie Mercer has come to accept her extraordinary magical powers as a demon, the Prodigium Council strips them away. Now Sophie is defenseless, alone, and at the mercy of her sworn enemies—the Brannicks, a family of warrior women who hunt down the Prodigium. Or at least that’s what Sophie thinks, until she makes a surprising discovery. The Brannicks know an epic war is coming, and they believe Sophie is the only one powerful enough to stop the world from ending. But without her magic, Sophie isn’t as confident. Sophie’s bound for one hell of a ride—can she get her powers back before it’s too late? If you haven't read this series yet you are definitely missing out! Check out the first book in the series called Hex Hall and you will be as hooked on Sophie Mercer and her adorably sweet witchy charm. Her love interest Archer Cross has a little something special going on too. I recommend this whole series if you are interested in Harry Potter but would like something on the little lighter side. Happy Reading to you!!

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Not Just Another Cyborg Story!


Debut author Marissa Meyer retells the classic story of Cinderella in a modern dystopian love story. It follows a teenage cyborg named Cinder and her unexpected romance with a human prince. Check out this review from Kidzworld:

The Epidemic

"Cinder, a teenage cyborg, remembers nothing about her life before age 11. Now she lives with her evil stepmother and two stepsisters who blame her for their father’s death. A plague has swept the city of New Beijing, and being a mechanic, Cinder works right in the heart of the city.
A Royal Sacrifice

The beloved Prince Kai - adored by all the young ladies in the country - is next in line for the throne. And now that his father has contracted the plague, it looks like his role as leader will begin prematurely. Unfortunately, his father is in the middle of negotiations with the Lunar Queen in the hopes of preventing a war. Now the negotiations way heavily on Kai’s shoulder as he must decide whether to marry the awful Queen, or face an impending war against the moon.
A Forbidden Love

Cinder and Prince Kai’s lives intertwine when the prince brings his broken android to her shop to be fixed. Her aloofness intrigues him and the more they interact, the more he finds himself falling for her. Unfortunately, he doesn’t know her secret: that she’s a cyborg. If Kai knew the truth, he’d be disgusted by his own advances.
Finding the Cure

As the plague rages on, Cinder discovers that she’s immune and hopes she can help Dr. Erland discover a cure in time to save her stepsister - the only member of her family who loves her.

The Bottom Line

Cinder by Marissa Meyer is an amazing story about love that comes in mysterious packages. It is so much more than just a Cinderella story. All of the characters are lovable and unforgettable."

Sunday, March 11, 2012

Surviving in a World of Magic

"The Fire" by James Patterson is the last book in the "Witch & Wizard" series! I just love Whit & Wisty and hope that this really won't be the last we see of them. This brother and sister duo are so cool and I love their strength to overcome all the odds against them. Their world is an anti-witch-establishment!!


Friday, March 02, 2012

Your Best & Worst Night Ever!


"I Love You Beth Cooper" by Larry Doyle 2007

This book is funny in a strange sadistic sort of way. It gives hope to those who go after what they really want and basically don't mind getting smacked in the eye, falling out of a window, almost ran over by a Hummer, losing their pants, and being bitten by a thousand mosquitoes just to be near the one that they adore. I would recommend this book to older teens 16+ that don't mind a few obscenities here and there. Doyle's writing is seriously hilarious and will have you laughing and snickering when some things are inappropriate, yet somehow still funny. I love this book because I can just hear sci fi nerds all over saying hurray for Denis Cooverman! Check out the movie on DVD too it's not too different than the book.

The Final Destiny of Love


“The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous and majorly hot plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, "The Fault in Our Stars" is award-winning author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. I hear there is already talk of making this book into a movie. One of my recommendations is to make sure that you are reading this book that you have a whole box of tissues nearby because the last quarter of the book is super emotional. I recommend this book to lovers of realistic fiction. It gets the most points I can give it for being dark,emotional,hopeful and stirring. Way to go John Green you did it again!!

Friday, December 16, 2011

Tweaking the Truth Is Harmless Right?

I just happened to pick up the book Harmless by Dana Reinhardt the other day and I am sure glad I did. The book is filled with the drama of high school woes and plays upon the idea of what is right and wrong and how far one can go to tweak the truth and get away with it. It is a fairly fast read and a real page turner. The one thing I keep thinking of after reading "Harmless" is don't ever lie because if you weave a web a lies it might get so big you can't find your way out of it.


Harmless by Dana Reinhardt (2008)

Ninth grade friends Emma, Anna, and Mariah are at a party with older high school boys when they should be at the movies like they told their parents. When Emma's mother calls her cell they freak out and decide to make up a story so they won't get in trouble at home. It seems like the easy way out. What happens next challenges their friendship, their community, their relationships with their families, and their sense of themselves. Told in the voices of the three girls who must learn to live with the lies they tell, "Harmless" is a gripping and provocative novel full of startling turns and surprises.

Monday, September 05, 2011

A Lion in the Library???

Library Lion written by Michelle Knudsen and illustrated by Kevin Hawkes. Candlwick Press 2006.

A touching tale about a very special place that I like to sometimes call home

This is a sweet and enchanting story about a lion that visits the library and receives a chance to participate in story time just like all the other children. But, once the lion breaks the rules and roars really loud he is told that he will have to be quiet or leave the library. The lion begins to understand the library rules and does many helpful things for the librarians. One day, an accident happens to the head librarian and the lion does something to break the rules but only to help her because she is hurt. He thinks that he will have to leave the library forever, however he finds out that sometimes rules can be broken especially if it is to save a person in danger. I just love this book and read it to several second grade classes yesterday and they loved it too! This would definitely be a lovely bedtime story for kids as well.