Thursday, December 18, 2014

If You Are A John Green Fan You Will Love These Books!

If You Are A John Green Fan You Will Love These Books!

Augustus Waters might be one of a kind, but there are other books besides your tearstained copy of The Fault in Our Stars that you will love. Whether it is heartbreaking teen sagas or charismatic verse-quoting sweethearts that have you turning page after page, these five books will satisfy your yearning until the movie comes out on June 6th. Just try not to cry too hard.

If I Stay by Gayle Forman
For fans of: Crying your eyes out
Mia has the coolest parents and an adorable little brother. She’s an amazing cellist, her best friend always has her back and her boyfriend loves to rock. She has no idea her life is about to change and there is nothing she can do to stop it. After a life shattering accident Mia must decide whether there is anything left in her life to make her wake up. If you're looking for a really good cry, this is the book for you. Awesome news! Chloë Grace Moretz stars in the film adaptation that is coming out this August!

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell
For fans of: Honest first love
If Augustus and Hazel taught us anything in The Fault In Our Stars, it's that falling in love can be crazy and heartbreaking at the same time—but for some reason it’s all worth it. Eleanor and Park share a similarly star-crossed fate as two misfit teenagers who love comic books, punk rock, and each other after a meet-cute on the school bus in 1986. This novel, which will make you see magic in music and proves that even handholding can be a revolutionary act of love, has garnered praise from John Green himself.

Every Day by David Levithan
For fans of: Universal love affairs
The only thing consistent about A's days is that he always wakes up in a new body and a new life. This makes forming any lasting bonds or commitments seemingly impossible—until he meets Rhiannon, who changes everything. He falls so head over heels that he'll do anything to stay with her, even if it means that he can't continue to be himself. With this novel, David Levithan, a guru of over the top narratives like Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist and Will Grayson, Will Grayson (which he co-wrote with John Green), has pushed romance in a wild and out direction that makes you think that maybe just maybe this could really happen.

Paper Towns by John Green
For fans of: The One & Only John Green
I couldn't end this list without recommending another novel from the amazing John Green. He's the head honcho of pairing up introverted teens with outlandish friends prone to having grandious personalities. In Paper Towns, enter Margo Roth Spiegelman, an infamous prankster. She ropes in her quiet neighbor Quentin (who'll be played by Nat Wolff in the upcoming film adaptation!) to commit her last ultimate prank and then she suddenly disappears into thin air. Quentin has the clues to find Margo, but will he find her in time? The amazing process that he goes through to find his one and only true love and partner in crime is worth every turn of the page.

Happy Holiday Reading!

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

I See Dead People - Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

Name of the Star: Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson

The day Louisiana teenager Rory Deveaux arrives in London marks a memorable occasion. For Rory, it's the start of a new life at a London boarding school. But for many, this will be remembered as the day a series of brutal murders broke out across the city, gruesome crimes mimicking the horrific Jack the Ripper events of more than a century ago.

Soon “Rippermania” takes hold of modern-day London, and the police are left with few leads and no witnesses. Except one. Rory spotted the man police believe to be the prime suspect. But she is the only one who saw him. Even her roommate, who was walking with her at the time, didn't notice the mysterious man. So why can only Rory see him? And more urgently, why has Rory become his next target? In this edge-of-your-seat thriller, full of suspense, humor, and romance, Rory will learn the truth about the secret ghost police of London and discover her own shocking abilities.

Ok, so I’ve been hanging out in London lately, well not really in London, but in my mind London for a whole entire month while reading the Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson. I am completely hooked on this series and I feel like Rory Deveaux is a character that I could totally be friends with. She's very brave, is funny in her own right of mind, she talks a lot and has great stories that I could just hear over and over and she has good values and can tell what is right and what is wrong.

Rory's life is by far anything but normal, she moved to London to attend an elite school called Wexford and upon chance ends up having to deal with a new found gift called “the sight” that allows her to see other beings that most people can’t see. If you like ghosts and secret ghost hunting societies that form a special bond with each other you will love Name of the Star. I first decided to read this book because it totally name drops Jack the Ripper in the summary, but after getting into the story I found that there is much more going on here than on a reality t.v. show!! Rory becomes friends with Stephen, Callum and Boo a dynamic trio with special ghost hunting operational forces. Facing new missions and mysteries around all kinds of ghosts, the four grow together and form an unbeatable team. I love this kind of teamwork especially since it deals with the paranormal and the dark and dangerous streets of London.

This is more than just a ghostly read, this is definitely an intriguing mystery that taps into the paranormal and beyond. The dialogue is perfect, the scenery described wonderfully, and the plot captivating. The ending is just enough of a tease that you'll immediately want to read the second book in the series The Madness Underneath (which is exactly what I did!). But... If you love this series as much as I do, I’m sorry to say that you’ll have to wait patiently for the third book The Shadow Cabinet to come out in February 2015!

"Fear can't hurt you. When it washes over you, give it no power. It's a snake with no venom. Remember that. That knowledge can save you." Jo ~World War II ghost lady

Happy Holidays & Happy Reading!

Not Your Average History Lesson - A Look at Historical Fiction

I’ve always been a fan of historical fiction – When I was a kid I loved reading about people that really excited in faraway times and places. My favorite book in high school was none other than Gone with the Wind which was set in the Civil War (go figure??) I think this love followed me to college because I went on to study Humanities in college and learned about the history of art, music, philosophy, religion, language, and how people experience all of these things. Nowadays, I love reading for fun and I love coming-of-age stories combined with fascinating periods of history around the world. If you are tired of the same old boring history lessons you’ve seen and want a great Historical Fiction read then this is place for you! Tune in each month as Mrs. Librarian Lady starts from zero and goes all the way up to the 1990’s. You will be amazed at how many great stories are based on real life people in history!

Here’s a little Historical Fiction kick starter for you!

Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials by Stephanie Hemphill - I have always been entranced with the Salem Witch Trials, so I am so glad that I found this terrific book! This story written in verse is based on the epic historical event that took place in Salem, Massachusetts throughout the year of 1692. Wicked Girls is very engaging and brings a stunning reality to the actual girls that accused many people of being witches in Salem during the 1600’s. This is a fictional account of what it might have been like for the girls that started the vicious lies and rumors about their friends and neighbors. The historical information on this subject is very easy to find in any history book or in the Salem museum. However, Hemphill gives a more personal look at how a handful of Puritan girls took hold of a town and used this fortune to their own advantage. I found this book to be a truly amazing account of how that year in 1692 unfolded in the town of Salem. This book also gives the reader insight on how difficult it must have been to live in the rural area of Salem and how strict and narrow minded the Puritan townspeople were.

Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys – Set in New Orleans, in 1950, the city is getting back to regular life with the war over. But for Josie Moraine, there’s no such thing as a normal life. Her mother is a brothel prostitute and Josie only wants to get out of New Orleans and attend college where she can make a life for herself without her mother’s reputation always tainting her attempts to make something of herself. But then someone dies in a pretty suspect way and Josie’s involvement in the investigation might keep her from ever being able to escape the Big Easy.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein– All I can say is that reading this book takes you back in time to World War II and it is an emotional and intense ride from the start. You get to read the story through written pages and notes. One side of the story is of Queenie the British spy who has been captured by the Nazi's in Nazi occupied France in 1943. She made the crucial mistake of looking the wrong way while crossing a busy street in the town of Ormaie, France. The Gestapo orders Queenie to unravel the tale of how she met her best friend Maddie and how they went down in the plane that Maddie was flying over France. Queenie manages to stay alive in prison as long as she's writing what the Gestapo approves of. Otherwise, she is horribly tortured. The second half is the story of Maddie and how she has to hide and survive in France after crashing the plane. The two stories woven together are totally compelling and the courage that these two young women possessed was amazing. I felt as if I was reading their personal diaries as it really happened all those year ago.This book is definitely a tribute to women and has resounding themes of friendship and courage throughout the book.

Tune in next month for more YA Historical Fiction recommendations!

Mrs. Librarian Lady ♥

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Reality Scoop - I love Realistic Fiction!

Reality Scoop by Kimberli Buckley

I love Realistic Fiction!
This month I want to take a look at something totally different. Think about this… YA books can actually save lives! Yes, this is an ode to Realistic Fiction that shows us teen tragedy and hard luck circumstances. Whether or not you are someone with excellent grades and no drug record, chances are you know of someone who has struggled in school, struggled with friends and grades, probably smoked, maybe they experimented, maybe they even took risks. And if you didn’t know someone in real life, you knew a fictional character that experienced all of that, and it opened your eyes to hardships in life. That’s right, YA books teach us a lot and they say to us “You’re not alone,” you could also say that YA books mirror reality. And it’s because of this terrifyingly perfect, realistic depiction of teen tragedy that some of the best realistic YA books have been banned.

Realistic Fiction is not only for escapism, but also a place of comfort, a home for those who feel they have nowhere to turn, that no one understands. Many YA authors are successful because their readers respond to realistic depictions of teen issues, such as death, sickness, abuse, or drugs. These kinds of stories aren’t a one-size-fits-all teens, but it can provide a powerful presence for the teens that have experienced some of life’s more difficult events.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 48% of teen deaths are caused by unintentional injuries, and 73% of those injuries were from vehicle accidents. 11% of deaths are from suicide, and 6% are from cancer. Through realistic fiction, YA literature allows readers to sympathize with the girl or boy in the back of the classroom, silent and misunderstood, holing up their problems and blaming themselves for sad events that have happened to them. If we can learn about hardship and suffering through a book, then maybe we can begin to understand what it’s like for those that have difficult lives.

Here are a few YA books that respect the intelligence of the reader, move the reader, and accurately portray teen tragedy.

Love Letters to the Dead by Ava Dellaira - When Laurel starts writing letters to dead people for a school assignment she begins to spill about her sister's mysterious death, her mother's departure.

Looking for Alaska by John Green - Sixteen-year-old Miles' first year at a private school in Alabama is defined by the search for answers about life and death after a fatal car crash.

The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan - Duncan gets wrapped up in the tragic tale of Tim Macbeth, a former student who had a clandestine relationship with the wrong girl, and his own ill-fated romance with Daisy.

Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley - Cullen's summer is marked by his cousin's death by overdose and his younger brother's sudden disappearance.

Stolen by Lucy Christopher - Sixteen-year-old Gemma is abducted while on vacation with her parents and taken to the Australian outback, where she soon realizes that escape attempts are futile.

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher - high school student Clay Jenkins receives thirteen cassette tapes recorded from his friend Hannah, who committed suicide, he spends a bewildering and heartbreaking night recounting the events leading up to her death.

Waiting for Normal by Leslie Connor - Twelve-year-old Addie tries to cope with her mother's erratic behavior when she and her mother go to live in a small trailer by the railroad tracks

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson - A traumatic event near the end of the summer has a devastating effect on Melinda's freshman year in high school.

I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak - Ed Kennedy begins receiving mysterious messages that direct him to addresses where people need help, and he begins getting over his lifelong feeling of worthlessness.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chobosky - A tale of adolescence whose hero is Charlie, a high school freshman in Pennsylvania. The novel follows Charlie as he is introduced to love, literature and friendships.

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton - The struggle of three brothers to stay together after their parent's death and their quest for identity among the conflicting values of their adolescent society.

Happy to Reading to You!

Monday, December 15, 2014

Tall, Dark & Mysterious Dudes: Hexed by Michelle Krys

This week’s featured book is Hexed by Michelle Krys. This book is a perfect blend of action, romance, and humor that kept me glued to the pages. I happen to love books about witches and witchcraft like James Patterson’s Witch & Wizard, so this book was already on my favorites list when I read that the main character Indigo was a witch who didn’t even know she was a witch. Aha clever right? Well, see for yourself.

A cheerleader at a Fairfield High in a position of popularity, Indigo’s life takes a turn when someone steals an important book from her mother’s occult store, ‘The Black Cat.’ Turns out the recessive genes for being a witch run in Indigo’s family, but until her 200th full moon, Indigo won’t know if she has inherited the powers herself. The stolen book is The Witch Hunter’s Bible, and if it falls into the wrong hands many witches will die. Thrust into the action of a war between witches and sorcerers with a high personal cost, Indigo finds herself under the tutelage of Bishop, an eighteen year-old Warlock who is determined to help her develop her powers. As the secret magical world starts to unfurl for Indigo, she realizes all is not as it seems and forms a plan to reclaim the book.
This is the first book in a new series called The Witch Hunter. Hexed focuses on the main character Indigo, who for the most part is a normal high school girl. Indigo is has a fun feisty spirit, a great sense of independence, and a spunky voice as she navigates her way through the magical world. She’s convinced her occult-believing mother was crazy, but feels that she must investigate some supernatural happenings just to be on the safe side. After meeting Bishop, Indigo adjusts remarkably well to her new life, shedding her cheerleader persona and clique friends without much difficulty because they weren’t real friends anyway.
Instead, Indigo finds a true friend in Paige who is loyal to her from the start. Bishop enters the scene as a mysterious stranger who Indigo just can’t figure out. Is he for real? Or is he something otherworldly altogether? After Indigo, Paige, and Bishop go out on the town, that’s when things really start to heat up in this story. There will be some heartbreak, challenges, and a few laughs along the way. Will Indigo learn the truth about her heritage and take on her chosen destiny? The world of witches is complicated and this book had several twists and turns in plot woven within a battle between witches and witch hunters that made me definitely want to keep reading this series. Hexed is an action-packed read and I am looking forward to the sequel!
Some of my favorite quotes-
“And I just know that this memory will be forever burned into my brain, because this kind of magic – the kind that can’t be conjured with a spell, where everything is just right, and all your problems vanish for three perfect minutes – doesn’t happen everyday.” Indigo Blackwood

” So you’re telling me that on the next full moon, I’m going to turn into a witch.”
” yes.” he nods solemnly. ” You’ll grow a hooknose within a hairy mole at the end, and your hair will turn gray and frizzy– or more frizzy, rather—and your back will grow a hump any camel would envy, and– "Be serious for once.” Indigo & Bishop

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Friday, December 12, 2014

I want to meet Simon & Baz - Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

FANGIRL by Rainbow Rowell
A coming-of-age tale of the joys and sorrows of fanfiction as well as the intriguing relationship between twins.

Cath is a Simon Snow fan. Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan . . . For Cath, being a fan is her life—and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving. Reading. Rereading the series. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, and dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere that’s all she has ever known until now. Now she and her Wren have moved away to college and Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to let go.

Before they left for college, Wren told Cath she didn’t want to be roommates. This leaves Cath to fend for herself in a new school with new people, which is completely outside of her comfort zone. She gets paired with Reagan a loud and vivacious roommate and her charming, always-around boyfriend, she has a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is a horrid crime to literature writing, she meets handsome classmate who only wants to steal her words . . . And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who has always had erratic behavior and has never really been alone.

For Cath, the questions are: Can she make it in college, Will she ever make any friends, and does she need Wren, or is it really the other way around? Another huge question is can Wren let go of Simon Snow? And, is she capable of letting other human beings into her life or will the walls that she has built since her mom left stay up forever?

It’s up to Cath to navigate this scary new world on her own. She maintains her sanity by writing her Simon Snow series called Carry On as she struggles to find out what it really means to be a good student, writer, and daughter all at the same time. And through all of this she tries to figure out just where on earth the cafeteria is. Through sheer panic and fear of new situations she decides it might just be easier to stock up on protein bars and lose herself in the world of fan fiction.

Rainbow Rowell is amazing. She writes so well, every word reaches out to you and pulls you further into the story. She captures the world of college and fanfiction writing head on and keeps you wanting more. I completely recommend this book it is very imaginative and brings to light the joys and sorrows of growing up and letting go of the past and moving forward and being open to new dreams.

Happy Reading to you all!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Parkour & murder just how I like it

What We Saw At Night by Jacqueline Mitchard

They sleep during the day, avoiding their greatest enemy: sunlight. When the sun sets and darkness falls, they hit the town. The nighttime world belongs to them. They are Children of Darkness. No, this isn't another young adult novel featuring pointy toothed, blood-sucking teen vampires. Jacquelyn Mitchard's novel What We Saw at Night is about a group of teenagers who suffer from the real world genetic disorder Xeroderma Pigmentosum. XP is a fatal allergy to sunlight. Allie Kim, along with her best friends Rob and Juliet, live in a parallel universe compared to "daytimers," the name they've given to people who don't suffer from XP. Allie wakes up when most people are getting home from school or work. She eats dinner as her breakfast and does her school work from home in the wee hours. And she's in bed by sunrise.
Of course, suffering from XP doesn't mean that Allie and her friends don't go through the same growing pains and angst that other teens their age experience. Allie has had a crush on Rob for as long as she can remember. But Allie can also see that Rob only has eyes for Juliet. Unfortunately for Rob, Juliet clearly couldn't be less interested in him. This creates a typical love triangle among very atypical teens. Then everything changes when Juliet introduces Allie and Rob to Parkour, also known as Freerunning, a stunt-sport that features running and climbing off forest cliffs and tall buildings. It's during one of these nighttime Parkour stunts that Allie stumbles upon what looks like a murder. Or at least that's what she tries to convince Rob and Juliet, who didn't see anything. Did she imagine it? XP can sometimes lead to hallucinations in its more degenerative stages. Could Allie be losing her mind?

As Allie delves deeper into what she saw, she uncovers what might be a larger conspiracy, involving a member of the Tabor family. That's the family of doctors that founded and operate the Tabor Clinic. The clinic is the leading research and treatment center for patients with XP. It is the reason Allie, Rob and Juliet's families all moved to Iron Harbor and it's their best hope for finding a cure to the disease. Not only that, Allie begins to suspect that one of her best friends might be involved in the crime. This revelation could lead to Allie, Juliet and Rob to being in serious danger. What We Saw at Night is an engaging blend of real-world drama involving a life-and-death illness and a whodunit thriller. Imagine John Green's recent "The Fault in Our Stars" in a mashup with a Nancy Drew mystery. plus some amazingmroof jumping and wall scaling.

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Steelheart: taking dystopia to another level!

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson is a fast-paced novel, and the first installment in his Reckoners series.

“The superheroes came, but they weren’t exactly what everyone thought they’d be. The Epics, as they’re called, have incredible powers, but with great power comes great corruptibility.
Soon, the Epics takes over the world. They fight against each other, gaining territory and ruling the humans as their subjects. Some are smart and set up cities in their honor, a place where they can control the population and get them to do their bidding.
Such is life in Newcago under Steeheart’s reign. It’s all David has known for the past 10 years. But while most people just try to survive in a world that is literally made of steel, David has other plans. He wants to join the Reckoners and avenge his father, whom Steelheart killed the day he came into town.
The Reckoners are a group of humans led by the mysterious Prof. Their goal is to kill as many Epics as possible. And David is about to show them what he’s got. He knows something no one else does. Because no matter what Steelheart says, he’s not completely invincible.
David’s seen Steelheart bleed, and he intends to see it again.”
Steelheart is a fast-paced, suspenseful page-turner. With cliffhangers at the end of every chapter, it will be hard to put this book down long enough to eat and sleep, never mind doing responsible things like going to work or school.
Set in a world that is vivid and complex, this is not a book that seems overwhelming or overly detailed. Sanderson does an excellent job of feeding you information that is necessary in the moment, rather than overloading you right from the beginning.
The humor in this book is well placed, as well. In a novel that could take itself too seriously but doesn’t, the purposefully terrible metaphors will have you laughing every time you think of them.
With a quickly escalating plot and a few twists and turns, this is definitely a book you’ll want on your to-be-read list. And while it does answer many of the questions raised throughout the book, enough is left unanswered to cause you to want to read the next installation, Firefight, like, right now. Sadly, we’ll have to wait until 2014 for that one.

“Incredible cosmic powers do not equate with high IQ.” David, Steelheart

Happy Reading to You!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Finding Your Way Through Hard Times

The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson

This month I read the very amazing Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson. The title kind of throws you off a bit because maybe you are wondering what does the knife have to do with it and how does it affect the memory. Well, I can tell you all about that! Anderson is one of my favorite authors because he writes with such honesty and grit. She has bravely touched upon very sensitive topics such as rape, eating disorders, suicide and addiction. In doing so, she has helped build the current landscape of contemporary young adult literature. Anderson writes the hard truth, stirs up the debate and discussion among both fans and objectors, and ultimately has created the long overdue conversations about the real issues teenagers face every day.

For the past five years, Hayley Kincaid and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons that have tortured him since his return from Iraq. Now they are back in the town where he grew up so Hayley can attend school. Perhaps, for the first time, Hayley can have a normal life, put aside her own painful memories, even have a relationship with Finn, the hot guy who obviously likes her but is hiding secrets of his own. Will being back home help Andy’s PTSD, or will his terrible memories drag him to the edge of hell, and drugs push him over?
The Impossible Knife of Memory portrays a growing, complex problem particularly relevant in the United States today: the devastating ripple effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. After five years of being home-schooled on the road with her truck-driver Dad, Andy, a veteran who is tormented by memories of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Hayley Kincain finally has a home. But instead of finding a fresh new start her senior year at public school, Hayley is barely getting by. She feels lost and alone in the sea of “normal” students that she refers to as zombies, Hayley never knows if her Dad is having a good day or a bad day, unfortunately until it is too late. He has been drinking so heavily and so much that he goes into rages and then blacks out.
Hayley’s only friend, Gracie, knows Hayley is struggling, but she’s busy with her own problems —Then Hayley meets Finn, a sharp-witted boy who manages to bring out the smart, clever girl others don’t see. But Hayley doesn’t trust Finn enough to share her secrets. In fact, she doesn’t trust anyone — and that’s the problem.
Anderson’s portrayal of a family broken by war, death, divorce and addiction is very honest. “Killing people is easier than it should be but staying alive is even harder.” Andy tells a teen on Veteran’s Day. Despite the heavy subject matter, Anderson’s observations offer very realistic and emotional depth and validation to this story. At the heart of it is a tough yet fragile girl who lives in a world with a rocky foundation beneath her feet that is constantly shifting and the relentless challenge to keep balance has worn her out.
The Impossible Knife of Memory is a beautifully written book. I loved how Anderson describes memories and situations. The relationships are heartbreaking, yet there is hope, and I think that’s what makes this book so emotionally draining. There is so much love and yet there is the knowledge that it might not be enough. The supporting characters in this book are full of drama, and distraction, but ultimately help the story and Hayley to come to a place of peace.

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read YA books!

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

All Elements of Life are Somehow Connected

The Magician’s Apprentice by Kate Banks

Sixteen-year-old Baz, holds a realistic mix of fear and bravery, as he accepts an unknown visitor’s invitation to leave his village and become a weaver’s apprentice. However, the abusive weaving master to whom he is delivered trades Baz for a sword to a wandering magician, Tadis, who dispenses magic and wisdom with equal alacrity. “ ‘Intention does not come from the mind, though the mind thinks it does. Intention comes from here.’ Tadis pointed to his heart.” Traveling with Tadis and his cart of tricks, Baz embarks on a long physical and spiritual journey to find his true destiny. Set in an unnamed Middle Eastern land and filled with vivid descriptions of earthquakes and sandstorms, as well as physical discomforts and homesickness, the book gently traces Baz’s growing understanding of the universal truths Tadis imparts. Sís’s distinctive, diminutive line drawings appear throughout as spot illustrations, perfectly complementing the understated yet rich voice in which Baz’s story is told.

I loved this story because Baz takes on many roles in each of his apprenticeships, first to a weaver and then to a magician. He learns both crafts, but truly experiences his best apprenticeship when he learns what is important in life. “Poetry in prose” is the apt description of this thought-provoking and insightful story. Kate Banks has taken her own point of view about what is important in life and put it into words through her characters, Baz and a magician and a plethora of lesser characters they meet on their journey together. They all influence Baz’s journey to self-realization. Baz first begins his journey by leaving home to become apprenticed to a master rug weaver. His two brothers have already left home to meet their own destinies, and Baz knows he must go. Along his journey, he meets cruelty and compassion, confusion and clarity, and finally, peace and harmony.

After the magician trades a mysterious sword for Baz, they travel to the desert and then to the mountains. Baz meets people who help him learn life’s most important lessons and eventually works his way back home to his family, which he never spiritually left. The author seems to be saying that all elements of life are somehow interconnected, all chance meetings are deliberate in the whole scheme of things, and peace and knowledge can be attained just by opening our eyes to our life journey, to nature and to trials and tribulations along the way. Banks has created a masterpiece for readers who like to think about all possibilities, who are open to change, and readers will find a certain peace to carry with them after reading this book. The characters are believable, the plot is creative, and multiple life lessons are sure to soothe the souls of all who venture inside the pages of this book. This is a great book for teens who have pondered their role in life. Once immersed in the book, the reader can help but join Baz throughout his amazing and transformational journey.

My favorite quote from the Magician’s Apprentice – “You must let go of your resistance. What is the worst thing that can happen?”

Happy Reading to you!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Friday, October 31, 2014

Wishes do explode... I mean come true

Spell Check by Julie Wright

I am so excited I finished this ebook on Halloween and I have to say that I loved it! It starts with a group of cheerleaders and their infamous leader Lisa Snoddy who you find to be an excellent “mean girl” are planning a prank on Allyson on her birthday, which just happens to be a few days before Halloween. Ally has no idea that the prank involves her hanging from a tree, and that Lisa and her clique are going to leave her there high and dry in the middle of the night all alone. She will soon find out though that every time she makes a wish something funny happens. Her wishes are awesome! Her best friend Kristin and Jake the hottest guy in school and the one who has stolen Allyson’s heart since 7th grade show up to rescue her. Later on, her Swedish grandmother shows up at her doorstep and tells her she has a magical family, LOL surprise! Allyson finally figures out what's been going on. After some totally hilarious situations arise she realizes that she has to get her head straight or she might spin out of control. My favorite part is at the end when she finally gets the wish she's always wanted to come true. Ooooooh Jake and Allyson possible love connection? I'll never tell. You'll just have to read Spell Check to find out!

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Mixed Up Names, Holidays & Love

I absolutely loved this little novella! I read it on my Galaxy! It was so cute, funny, sweet and definitely got me ready for the holidays. I thought it was very adorable that the two main characters had the same name only flipped around Ty McKenzie and Mackenzie Tyler . This brought me closer to the characters and helped me to see that they really had something in common. Ty was super awesome and would be the guy that I would want my daughter to date and fall in love with, sweet, thoughtful and pretty cute. Kenzie was great because she helped to heal a bond that had been broken between Ty and his mom and that meant everything in the world to both of them. I love the holidays, but sometimes I feel like I can bogged down in all of the commercialism. This story helped me to get excited about decorating, shopping, baking, and even ice skating. It was short, but I don't really have a whole lot of time to read, so I really loved that too! I'm going to see if I can read some more from the ALL I WANT anthology.

Mrs. Librarian Lady is a cool cat who loves to read!

Friday, August 29, 2014

Love, Laughter & Loss + Forgiveness = Real Life

The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

Seventeen-year-old Lennie Walker (named
after John Lennon), bookworm and band
geek, plays second clarinet and spends her
time tucked safely and happily in the shadow
of her fiery sister Bailey. But when Bailey
dies suddenly, Lennie is catapulted to center
stage of her own life—and, despite her
nonexistent history with boys, finds herself
struggling to balance two. Toby was
Bailey’s boyfriend; his grief mirrors Lennie’s
own. Joe is the new boy in town, a
transplant from Paris whose nearly magical
grin is matched only by his musical talent.
For Lennie, they’re the sun and the moon;
one boy takes her out of her sorrow, the
other comforts her in it. But just like their
celestial counterparts, they can’t collide
without the whole wide world exploding.
I can safely say The Sky is Everywhere
is one of my favorite books ever. I have never
finished a book and felt this emotional before,
last night when I turned the last page I felt like
crying, laughing, writing and running in a field
to nowhere in particular, and all at the same
time. It’s now been almost 12 hours and I can’t
stop thinking about this book!
I wasn’t really looking for a serious book I just
chose this one because it was sitting on the
shelf in the YA room looking a bit lonely. From
start to finish, my heart broke and got glued
back together more than once and I feel like
the cast of characters are now permanently
stuck to my life. The things from this book that
really stuck with me are how close Lennie and
her sister Bailey were, Joe’s eyelashes (bat,
bat, bat), Toby’s sad eyes and Gram’s

Beautifully written, The Sky is Everywhere
is about loss, grief, pain, healing, hoping and
love. The sudden death of Bailey a vibrant
nineteen-year-old is at the center of the story,
and her family’s struggle to cope is
heartbreaking and heartwarming at the same
time. Bailey and Lennie have been raised by
their grandmother and uncle, as their mother
abandoned them years before. The girls talk
about their mother as if she is on a journey
around the world and she’ll be back someday
to stay. The love stories in this book are
many and multi-layered. They include the
love between sisters, the mother-like love
between grandmother and granddaughter,
and breathtaking head-over-heels first love.
Music and poetry bring together the
instruments of healing for Lennie and her
family in this wonderful story about loss, love
and forgiveness.

Happy Reading To You!!!
Mrs. Librarian Lady

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Teenage killing machines in Texas

Reboot (2013)
by Amy Tintera

Five years ago, Wren Connolly was shot three times in the chest. After 178 minutes she came back as a Reboot: stronger, faster, able to heal, and less emotional. The longer Reboots are dead, the less human they are when they return. Wren 178 is the deadliest Reboot in the Republic of Texas. Now seventeen years old, she serves as a soldier for HARC (Human Advancement and Repopulation Corporation).
This book caught my attention from the start! I loved the uniqueness of this story. The teens aren't zombies when they come back, but somehow they are similar to the walking dead. But, maybe a more sophisticated and high tech zombie type being would be a more accurate description.
Reboot is about a group of teens that come back to life after they have died. They receive their numbers after name by how many minutes they have been dead. Once they are rebooted they get taken to a facility and used as bounty hunters, assassins and military type force. The more minutes you were down before you rebooted the less human you are. Therefore, Wren 178 is a well oiled killing machine. When she gets paired up to train Callum 22 she doesn't realize how much this almost human boy will change her and her future.

In this strange world of the Republic of Texas only teens are rebooted and humans are taught to fear and hate the Reboots. Sadly, Reboots are created to be killing machines that are used and controlled. You might think that a Reboot killing machine might not be a great character to read about, but I absolutely loved Wren. She was a merciless, yet Callum was able to bring out her true emotions. Emotions that had been buried deep within her. Her feelings were so new to her that she basically had to come to terms with her past.

I was so happy that the book ended at a point that didn't leave me screaming and pulling out my hair in frustration! While I love a good devastating cliffhanger occasionally, my heart can't take it all the time (I'm talking about you Lauren Oliver 

As a debut, Reboot really does stand out as a great dystopian in a sea of average material. I definitely recommend Reboot to any fan of dystopian, action, or fantasy!

Happy Reading to You!